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Socialist Left Party (Norway)




That does that women should consider as much as men, that there must be more great in the top guns, and that there are fighting schemes that provide information in the workplace. As The Editor claimed in a countless editorial:.


Norwegian- Somali writer Amal Aden explained that "we do not earn anything from the policies of the Socialist Left. They say that everyone is okay, and that does not work". The party believes the only way to create social equality is to create ethnic equality in Norway. The party in particular wants more liberal regulations for asylium cases that involve children. Supporters included Kristin Halvorsen, who favored NATO 's air strikes, but a large group within the party vehemently opposed such support, arguing that violence would only lead to more violence. They wanted the United Nations to find a peaceful solution to the conflict.

This led to a split within the party, with the first group supporting her resignation and the larger second faction concluding that the NATO bombing was to be immediately terminated if the Serbs stopped the ethnic cleansing in Kosovo, if Halvorsen continued as party leader. They were against the U. Their main reason was that Norway, along with the Netherlands"clearly had the most soldiers located in Afghanistan [ One example of this is the party leaderwho stands for election every second year. The Board consists of 19 members.

Members are elected by each county, plus six members are directly elected during the national convention; some of these are permanent members. In total, there are 36 members. The board meets approximately six times a year to deal with current political and organisational issues. Its task is to adopt the party's budget and to select the party's permanent political representatives. Members of the committee are elected by the national convention. The Left is talking economics and the Right is talking values. That's why the Right is winning. But the Left can come back.

The success of centre-right parties in the New Zealand election in July illustrates this point. The economy featured so little in the campaign and the minds of voters that The Press in Christchurch observed in an editorial: So cut off are the general election festivities from the main issues [world commodity prices, the kiwi dollar and overseas share markets], it is almost like sitting through Nero's recital on the night Rome burned. United Future, a Christian-focused centre-right party which campaigned on increased support for families, increased its share of the vote from 0. The number of seats to which it was entitled jumped from one to eight, which gave it considerable power when discussing with Labour leader Helen Clark how much support it would give her minority government.

In the final negotiations, United Future was promised a Commission for the Family and a stay on the legalisation of cannabis in return for its support on confidence and supply. To the extent that the focus on values has been important, the key question for the centre-left is not 'how do we imitate the right's position on these issues', but 'what is our position on these issues and how will we get that across? These issues have also been cited as reasons for the rise of the far-right in Western Europe. Thus, an economic slowdown and the post-September 11 fear of terrorism have 'coincided with a popular backlash against a Europe of open borders, good for criminals as well as tourists, and against generous immigration policies' 40 to turn voters away from social democratic policies towards those of the centre- and far-right.

A distinctive feature of the swing to the right in Western Europe is that it runs counter to much of the region's traditional political culture in which the state has played a large role in the economy, especially through corporatist arrangements with labour and business.

Political Distrust and Euroscepticism Adding to voters' economic and national security fears is a growing distrust of political leaders, both at home and in the distant EU bureaucracy in Brussels. Politicians, especially those of the incumbent centre-left parties, are condemned as being arrogant and out of touch with voters and their concerns. Parties of the right are seen to be 'feeding off antipathy' towards the European Union, 43 which is on the brink of a dramatic increase in size, with plans to admit 13 new member countries and more than million new citizens in the next few years.

They are also worried about the EU itself, which 'seems to many Europeans to have swallowed their national identity in a meddling, continent-wide bureaucracy that no-one elected'. However, there is not necessarily a link between popular views and electoral preferences on this issue. Writing about the lack of success of the far-right in Sweden, Rydgren, 52 of Stockholm University's Department of Sociology, points out that although Swedes were just as xenophobic as other Europeans, they were less concerned about immigration and race as an election issue. This suggests that political parties do not need to move to become anti-immigration because citizens hold certain views on the issue.

Rather, some parties may choose to turn immigration into an election issue because they think it may gain them some political advantage. Other Trends in the Election Results The major theme of Figures 1 to 4 shown earlier is the rise of the centre-right and the decline of the centre-left. However, Figures 5 to 11 show other patterns, including steady gains by some small regionalist parties, some parties of the far-right though not othersparties of the far-left particularly the non-communist far-leftand green parties. When major parties converge and focus on catch-all strategies, they may open up 'specific niches in the party system' that can be occupied by new, smaller parties.

What these niche parties have in common is profiles of demographic support that are very distinctive. Thus, Democrats and Greens are far more likely to receive the votes of the young than either major party in Australia, a phenomenon repeated for green parties elsewhere. Much of the research in this area suggests this is not something that can be reversed, though new allegiances between social groups and particular parties may form. Unless this long-term pattern is reversed and there is no obvious reason that it will bethe electorate will remain increasingly volatile, and increasingly fragmented on issue lines. This may mean that issues will be increasingly important to the votes of all parties, and demographics less so, though this will show most clearly in voting for minor parties.

sicialist The Rise of the Far-Right? As a preliminary comment, we note that the far-right is not a single entity: In the current climate, it may make paryt sense to talk of the eocialist right, or even simply of xenophobic parties. The parties considered here are generally nationalist, with anti-immigration views. A few, such as Norway's Fremskrittspartiet Progress Partyare also soicalist or libertarian in some ckre, while both the Progress Party and the Dutch Pim Eex. List have argued for more spending on public services. Se. Australian's Europe correspondent, Peter Wilson, argues that almost all of the European far-right parties 'rely on supporters who tend be poorer, older and less educated than average, and who feel besieged by economic change and isolated from what they see as cosy and corrupt mainstream leaders'.

This reaction has allowed the far-right to take advantage of the gaps left by the mainstream parties, whose messages have become increasingly blurred as they move to the centre in a bid to attract more of the disaffiliated 'swinging' voters. As Wilson observes of The Netherlands and France: Both nations have enjoyed long periods of economic growth and relatively low unemployment, but the populists' message still resonated because of the perception that in the centrist, technocratic world of post-Cold War politics, the major parties are a cosy, self-perpetuating elite who don't speak the public's language. In fact, we would argue that support for the far-right is not rising, despite the media hype to the contrary.

Figure 5 certainly shows some mixed results. The National Front actually lost ground in the French parliamentary elections and had its presidential candidate emphatically rejected, disappointing even Le Pen's supporters. However, the party's rise was largely at the expense of more extreme parties, the xenophobic Swiss Democrats and the far-right Freedom Party of Switzerland. In Austria, one of the far-right's 'success stories', the Freedom Party of Austria became a coalition partner after the elections of As the graph earlier showed, it was the standout performer among far-right parties. However, after the election it became mired in controversy, its leader was under investigation for bribing police, it lost several ministers, and its popularity in opinion polls and regional elections has suffered.

The issuers conclusive here are definitely getting, with anti-immigration views. Meanwhile, they should be opened back.

In Denmark, the Danish People's Party gained in popularity, but did coee partly at the expense of another far-right party, the Progress Party. He claimed that there were more women than men serving in the departments the party controlled. Hagen of the Progress Party accused the party of supporting free immigration to Norway, after Lisbeth Holand proposed that immigrants from non-European countries should have the same immigration opportunities as immigrants who have their origins from countries who are members of the European Economic Area. While Hagen was highly critical, she felt that the policy would offer housing and jobs for non-Europeans who needed them.

Social geographer Karl Fredrik Tangen responded that it is easy for the typical intellectual Socialist Left voter, living in upper class areas, to agree to what was for them hypothetical question.

Socialist left of (norway) hard party Samles core sex

Norwegian- Somali writer Amal Aden explained that "we do not earn anything from the policies of the Socialist Left. They say that everyone is okay, and that does not work". The party believes the only way to create social equality is to create ethnic equality in Norway. The party in particular wants more liberal regulations for asylium cases that involve children. Supporters included Kristin Halvorsen, who favored NATO 's air strikes, but a large group within the party vehemently opposed such support, arguing that violence would only lead to more violence.

They wanted the United Nations to find a peaceful solution to the conflict. This led to a split within the party, with the first group supporting her resignation and the larger second faction concluding that the NATO bombing was to be immediately terminated if the Serbs stopped the ethnic cleansing in Kosovo, if Halvorsen continued as party leader. They were against the U. Their main reason was that Norway, along with the Netherlands"clearly had the most soldiers located in Afghanistan [ One example of this is the party leaderwho stands for election every second year.


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